Thermosiphon™ Solar Geysers

Install a Thermosiphon™ today, and feed your existing geyser with hot water direct from the pre-heater, DOUBLING your volume of hot water at NO EXTRA COST.

Thermosiphon™ and Heatbox™ are revolutionary pre-heating solar solutions from Solarent™. These solar water heaters are the first of their kind in South Africa and the proud owners of two registered patents.

Thermosiphon™ The new shape of solar

  • Options for both inland (frost) and coastal (frost free) areas. All frost areas must use the evacuated tube system. For coastal or frost free areas, you have the choice between the evacuated tube, or flat panel options.
  • Save on your electricity bill – Because Thermosiphon™ is so affordable your payback is reduced to less than 2.5 years.
  • Includes new Solar Geyser – yes, we fit an additional 150L geyser with a 5 year warranty
  • Double volume of hot water at no extra cost – With an additional 150L of hot water from the Solar geyser.
  • Accredited to The City of Cape Town Solar Water Heating Programme – Proudly supporting the City of Cape Town.
  • Heatbox™ Lite is the “no frills” option. This option does not come with a geyser controller/timer.
  • Cash or Rent-To-Own options available – finance options are available through Solarent for up to 60 months.

What are the pros and cons of a Thermosiphon™ Solar Geyser?

Heat your geyser efficiently using the Sun’s energy ~ No maintenance and no moving parts.

  • Closed system, few components, means less can go wrong and no maintenance.
  • Water circulates via the natural thermosiphon process.
  • Easy, quick, low risk installation.
  • Excellent savings on electricity (25 – 40%), especially in the summer months.
  • Weather dependent. For solar to be effective, the sun must shine. Summer savings are excellent, but in winter the savings are reduced. You do still however save in winter.
  • Aesthetically not as pleasing as other options, as the geyser is visible on the roof.

What are the differences?

HOW PRE-HEATING THERMOSIPHON WORKS

1. Cold water enters your solar geyser straight from your cold water mains.

2. Cold water is drawn down into the solar panel. As the cold water moves through the solar panel, it will gradually heat up, making its way back to the geyser as warm water. This process continues, slowly heating the water up throughout the day. This process is called “thermosiphoning”.

3. As you open your taps to draw water, you will draw water from your existing (or primary) geyser. With standard geyser installations, once you draw water from your geyser, it will fill up with water from your cold water inlet. With our preheater, this is not the case. Your primary geyser will fill with hot water from your solar geyser, significantly reducing the need for your electrical element to kick in, saving you money on electricity.

HOW A THERMOSIPHON WORKS

1. Cold water enters your solar geyser straight from your cold water mains.

2. Cold water is drawn down into the solar panel. As the cold water moves through the solar panel, it will gradually heat up, making its way back to the geyser as warm water. This process continues, slowly heating the water up throughout the day. This process is called “thermosiphoning”.

3. As you open your taps to draw water, you will draw water from your solar geyser. The water in this geyser is then replaced with cold water from your mains. And so the process continues.

How Solar Works

The heating up of a geyser accounts for a good chunk of a homes energy use, on average about 40% – 60% of your electricity account is contributed to your geyser.

Solar Water Heating is about as green as hot water can get and is an excellent clean energy source: its fuel, sunlight, is limitless, free and emits nothing when converted into energy.

When you’re talking about heating water (as opposed to powering light bulbs or stereos), the sunlight doesn’t need to become electricity.

It needs to become hot. And turning sunlight into heat is no problem. The core of a solar water heater is a solar collector (flat plate or evacuated tubes) and a storage tank (geyser).

Cold water travels from the geyser to the collector via either a natural thermosiphoning, or with the help of a pump. The water is heated up as it travels through the collector and hot water is transferred back to the geyser where it is stored.

You may need…

Depending on whether or not you stay in a frost prone area you may need a direct or indirect Solar Water Heater:

Indirect:

Instead of heating water, the solar collector heats a “heat transfer” fluid, such as antifreeze. The antifreeze then flows into the sealed piping of a heat exchanger, where it is surrounded by water. The water picks up the heat from the antifreeze (but never mixes with it), and is then pumped into a geyser. An alternative to to an indirect system would be Evactuated Tubes.

Direct:

Water moves through the solar collector and into a geyser with the help of electrical pumps and controls, or via a natural thermosiphoning process.